Broccolini chimichurri & aioli - photo philip blankenship

Chimichurri and aioli are two classic, raw condiments often served with grilled meats, fish, chicken and vegetables. Chimichurri is originally from Argentina, aioli from Provence but they work beautifully next to each other as options on the table or together on the same plate. Broccolini is not usually on the ingredient list for either one but it’s earthy flavor does very well with the herbs and garlic and mellows from the creamy oils. It is a delicious way to add some extra nutrition.

Broccolini was created in California by crossing broccoli with Chinese kale. Compared to broccoli the flowerettes are smaller and less dense and the stalks are longer and thinner making them softer and easier to chew. Broccolini is usually a little bit sweeter than broccoli but they are nutritionally similar and interchangeable in most recipes. Both below recipes can be made with broccolini, broccoli, spinach, kale, assorted fresh herbs…


broccolini chimichurri
ingredients

1 cup roughly chopped fresh broccoli
1 cup packed, roughly chopped fresh cilantro
1 cup packed, roughly chopped fresh flat leaf parsley
¼ cup roughly chopped shallots
2 garlic cloves
½ cup olive oil
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper

directions

Blend all ingredients in a food processor until finely chopped and blended.

Refrigerate.

Makes 1 ½ cups.


broccolini & tarragon aioli
ingredients

3 tablespoons chopped fresh broccolini
1 tablespoon packed, chopped fresh tarragon
1-2 garlic cloves
2 large egg yolks
2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
½ tsp salt
1 cup grapeseed oil
pinch of cayenne pepper

directions

Process broccolini, tarragon, garlic, egg yolks, lemon juice and salt in a food processor until yolks are creamy light and greens finely chopped.

Keep the processor on and drizzle oil in slowly, a little at a time, until it turns into a thick and creamy, sea foam colored aioli.

Refrigerate.

Makes 1 cup.


Photography by Philip Blankenship.